United States Coin Mint Marks

United States Coin Mint Marks

The Mint Mark position is usually found on the reverse of coins minted prior to 1965 (with the cent being the exception), and on the obverse after 1967. Coins struck at the Philadelphia Mint before 1979 (except 1942-1945 five-cent pieces) do not have a mint mark.
Mintmarks that appear on US coins include: C: Charlotte (Gold only, 1838-1861) CC: Carson City (1870-1893) D: D: O: New Orleans (1838-1909) P: Philadelphia (Silver "Nickels" 1942-45; Dollar coins 1979 to date; other coins except cents 1980 to date. S: San Francisco (1854 to date.
Many coins issued by the U.S. Mint feature a mint mark – a small letter indicating where the coin was struck. In all, a total of 8 different U.S. Mints have issued coins. Mint marks on United States coins began with the passage of the Act of March 3, 1835 (which established the first branch U.S. Mints).
The following is a list of United States mints, past and present: Location, Years of operation, Mint mark, Notes. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1793–, P or none, Pennies and other coins struck prior to 1980 do not carry Philadelphia mint marks, .
There have been several mints that produced coins for the United States over the years. The following table shows images of mintmarks from each of the eight .
Mint Mark locations on United States coins, and important facts about U.S. Mints and mint marks you might not have heard about. Denver Mint-D, San Fransisco .

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